County Judge

The Commissioner’s Court in Texas serves as both the legislative and executive branches of county government and has budgetary authority over all county departments, including those of headed by other elected officials.  The County Judge presides over the Commissioners’ Court and serves as Chief Executive Officer for Montgomery County

Craig Doyal (I) – Judge Doyal holds a BS in Science from Texas A&M University.  His political career began in 2001 when he became Precinct 2 Commissioner.  In 2014 he defeated Mark Bosma to replace the retiring Alan Barb Sadler as County Judge.  Prior to entering politics he owned a local roofing company for twenty years.

The following are some of the highlights of his three years as County Judge.

One of the first items on the newly elected Judge’s agenda was to ask the Commissioner’s Court for full authority to restructure key employee positions within the County. The Commissioner’s voted 4-1 in favor of the proposal, with James Noack being the lone no vote.  Doyal then moved immediately to lay off his political opponent and twenty-three year county employee, Mr. Bosma, from his position as Director of Infrastructure. 

In another controversial move in 2015, Judge Doyal proposed an extension of The Woodlands Parkway from FM2978 to FM249 as part of a $350 million County Road Bond. The bond issue was met with fierce opposition by residents of South County and it was defeated in a record turnout.  Undeterred, Judge Doyal recently called for the unpopular Parkway Extension, now dubbed the “Woodtrace Parkway”, to be revived.

Judge Doyal, along with Precinct 2 Commissioner Charley Riley and political consultant Mark Davenport are currently being tried for violations of the Texas Open Meetings Act that were related to the original bond issue.  In addition, the County District Attorney has empanelled a Grand Jury to look into charges of misuse of County property and assets, by both Doyal and Riley.

Doyal is also spearheading the use of $100m in general county funds (without voter approval) to build a 3.6 mile section of the Aggie Expressway along FM249, instead of compelling TxDoT to build it with the use of state, not local funding. 

County spending has risen sharply over the three plus years of Doyal’s leadership, much faster than the county’s rate of growth plus inflation formula that was created by a 2010 Ballot Referendum. 

In summary, Judge Doyal’s first term has seen unrestrained spending increases, an unwillingness to enact ethics and anti-nepotism policies, heavy-handed personnel moves and significant legal issues.  We do not believe that Mr. Doyal should be elected to another term.

Mark Keough – Mark Keough is our preferred candidate in this race.

Mr. Keough holds a BA from Cedarville College, a Master of Divinity degree from Grace Theological Seminary, and a Master of Sacred Theology from the Dallas Theological Seminary.  He has also completed course in Courtroom Mediation and Family Mediation.  He spent many years in the automobile business before he retired to take up the leadership of The Woodlands Bible Church.  Mr. Keough began his political career in 2014 when he won election the Texas House in District 15.

Keough is running on a platform of lower county spending and property taxes, enhanced transparency, the elimination of both conflicts of interest and emoluments currently afforded to Montgomery County Elected Officials. 

In his two terms in the Texas House, Keough was ranked as one of its most fiscally responsible members.  Texans for Fiscal Responsibility have endorsed Representative Keough for this position. He also had a perfect 100% rating from Texas Right to Life on pro-life issues in both the 84th and 85th Legislative Sessions.

We feel that Mr. Keough is better equipped to lead Montgomery County as it continues its rapid growth.  With his combination of business, pastoral and legislative experience we believe that he will work diligently to increase the efficiency of County government, rein in the County budget and return transparency and ethics to the office of County Judge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Commissioner’s Court in Texas serves as both the legislative and executive branches of county government and has budgetary authority over all county departments, including those of headed by other elected officials.  The County Judge presides over the Commissioners’ Court and serves as Chief Executive Officer for Montgomery County

 

Craig Doyal (I) – Judge Doyal holds a BS in Science from Texas A&M University.  His political career began in 2001 when he became Precinct 2 Commissioner.  In 2014 he defeated Mark Bosma to replace the retiring Alan Barb Sadler as County Judge.  Prior to entering politics he owned a local roofing company for twenty years.

 

The following are some of the highlights of his three years as County Judge.

 

One of the first items on the newly elected Judge’s agenda was to ask the Commissioner’s Court for full authority to restructure key employee positions within the County. The Commissioner’s voted 4-1 in favor of the proposal, with James Noack being the lone no vote.  Doyal then moved immediately to lay off his political opponent and twenty-three year county employee, Mr. Bosma, from his position as Director of Infrastructure. 

 

In another controversial move in 2015, Judge Doyal proposed an extension of The Woodlands Parkway from FM2978 to FM249 as part of a $350 million County Road Bond. The bond issue was met with fierce opposition by residents of South County and it was defeated in a record turnout.  Undeterred, Judge Doyal recently called for the unpopular Parkway Extension, now dubbed the “Woodtrace Parkway”, to be revived.

 

Judge Doyal, along with Precinct 2 Commissioner Charley Riley and political consultant Mark Davenport are currently being tried for violations of the Texas Open Meetings Act that were related to the original bond issue.  In addition, the County District Attorney has empanelled a Grand Jury to look into charges of misuse of County property and assets, by both Doyal and Riley.

 

Doyal is also spearheading the use of $100m in general county funds (without voter approval) to build a 3.6 mile section of the Aggie Expressway along FM249, instead of compelling TxDoT to build it with the use of state, not local funding. 

 

County spending has risen sharply over the three plus years of Doyal’s leadership, much faster than the county’s rate of growth plus inflation formula that was created by a 2010 Ballot Referendum. 

 

In summary, Judge Doyal’s first term has seen unrestrained spending increases, an unwillingness to enact ethics and anti-nepotism policies, heavy-handed personnel moves and significant legal issues.  We do not believe that Mr. Doyal should be elected to another term.

 

Mark Keough – Mark Keough is our preferred candidate in this race.

 

Mr. Keough holds a BA from Cedarville College, a Master of Divinity degree from Grace Theological Seminary, and a Master of Sacred Theology from the Dallas Theological Seminary.  He has also completed course in Courtroom Mediation and Family Mediation.  He spent many years in the automobile business before he retired to take up the leadership of The Woodlands Bible Church.  Mr. Keough began his political career in 2014 when he won election the Texas House in District 15.

 

Keough is running on a platform of lower county spending and property taxes, enhanced transparency, the elimination of both conflicts of interest and emoluments currently afforded to Montgomery County Elected Officials. 

 

In his two terms in the Texas House, Keough was ranked as one of its most fiscally responsible members.  Texans for Fiscal Responsibility have endorsed Representative Keough for this position. He also had a perfect 100% rating from Texas Right to Life on pro-life issues in both the 84th and 85th Legislative Sessions.

 

We feel that Mr. Keough is better equipped to lead Montgomery County as it continues its rapid growth.  With his combination of business, pastoral and legislative experience we believe that he will work diligently to increase the efficiency of County government, rein in the County budget and return transparency and ethics to the office of County Judge.